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Archive for April, 2010

Get Growing Brochure – Cover

Monday, April 26th, 2010

Get Growing Brochure – Cover

Info Share Policy

Monday, April 26th, 2010

Info Share Policy

US DOLETA BIOSCIENCE Competency Model

Monday, April 26th, 2010

Employment and Training Administration 1

United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
Bioscience Competency Model
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration 2
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
Table of Contents
About the Model ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
Tier One: Personal Effectiveness Competencies ………………………………………………. 4
Interpersonal Skills ………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
Integrity………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
Professionalism ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
Initiative ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
Dependability and Reliability ………………………………………………………………………. 4
Lifelong Learning ………………………………………………………………………………………… 4
Tier Two: Academic Competencies ………………………………………………………………….. 5
Reading ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5
Writing ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
Mathematics ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5
Science …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5
Communication—Listening and Speaking …………………………………………………… 6
Critical and Analytical Thinking ………………………………………………………………….. 6
Basic Computer Skills ………………………………………………………………………………….. 6
Tier Three: Workplace Competencies ………………………………………………………………. 8
Teamwork ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8
Planning and Organizing …………………………………………………………………………….. 8
Innovative Thinking …………………………………………………………………………………….. 8
Problem Solving and Decision Making ………………………………………………………… 9
Working with Tools and Technology …………………………………………………………… 9
Checking, Examining, and Recording ………………………………………………………….. 9
Business Fundamentals ……………………………………………………………………………… 10
Tier Four: Industry-Wide Technical Competencies ……………………………………….. 11
Bioscience Fundamentals …………………………………………………………………………… 11
Research and Development ……………………………………………………………………….. 11
Manufacturing and Production ………………………………………………………………….. 12
Quality Control and Assurance ………………………………………………………………….. 13
Health, Safety, and Security ……………………………………………………………………….. 14
Tier Five: Industry Sectors ……………………………………………………………………………… 15
Resources and Organizations Reviewed ………………………………………………………… 17
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration 3
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
ABOUT THE MODEL
Before reviewing the Bioscience Competency Model, it may be helpful to understand the model framework.
The competency model is depicted in a graphic consisting of nine tiers. The arrangement of the tiers in a
pyramidal shape is not meant to be hierarchical, or to imply that competencies at the top are at a higher level
of skill. The model’s shape represents the increasing specialization and specificity in the application of skills as
you move up the tiers. Tiers 1-5 are divided into blocks. The blocks represent competency areas, that is, the
skills, knowledge, abilities, and other factors essential to successful performance in the Bioscience industry. A
table of the competency definitions and associated key behaviors follows, providing description of the
competencies.
Tiers 1 through 3 contain Foundation Competencies, which form the foundation needed to be ready to enter
the workplace.
Tier 1 – Personal Effectiveness Competencies are shown as hovering below the pyramid because these
competencies are essential for all life roles. Often referred to as “soft skills,” personal effectiveness
competencies are generally learned in the home or community and reinforced and honed at school and in
the workplace. They represent personal attributes that may be challenging to teach or assess.
Tier 2 – Academic Competencies are critical competencies primarily learned in a school setting. They
include cognitive functions and thinking styles. Academic competencies are likely to apply to all
industries and occupations.
Tier 3 – Workplace Competencies represent motives and traits, as well as interpersonal and selfmanagement
styles. They generally are applicable to a large number of occupations and industries.
Tiers 4 and 5 contain Industry Competencies, which are specific to an industry or industry sector. Cross-cutting
industry-wide technical competencies make it possible to create career lattices within an industry wherein a
worker can move easily across industry sub-sectors. Rather than narrowly following a single occupational
career ladder, this model supports the development of an agile workforce.
Tier 4 – Industry-Wide Technical Competencies represent the knowledge and skills that are common
across sectors within a broader industry. These technical competencies build on, but are more specific
than, competencies represented on lower tiers.
Tier 5 – Industry-Sector Technical Competencies represent a sub-set of industry technical competencies
that are specific to an industry sector.
Tiers 6 through 9 represent the specialization that occurs within specific occupations within an industry.
Information on occupational competencies is available through O*NET OnLine
(http://online.onetcenter.org/).
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration 4
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
Tier 1—Personal Effectiveness Competencies
1. Interpersonal Skills: Displaying skills to work with others from diverse backgrounds.
 Work effectively in a multicultural, global environment
 Respect the opinions, perspectives, customs, and individual differences of others
 Interact appropriately and respectfully with supervisors and coworkers
 Use appropriate strategies and solutions for dealing with conflicts and differences to maintain a
smooth workflow
 Utilize emotional intelligence to identify, understand, and manage emotions
2. Integrity: Displaying accepted social and work behaviors.
 Treat others with honesty, fairness, and respect
 Comply with ethical standards for your field
 Take responsibility for accomplishing work goals within accepted timeframes
 Accept responsibility for one’s decisions and actions
3. Professionalism: Maintaining a professional demeanor at work.
 Demonstrate self-control by maintaining composure and dealing calmly with stressful situations
 Accept criticism and attempt to learn from mistakes
 Demonstrate a positive attitude towards work
 Dress appropriately for occupation and maintain appropriate personal hygiene
 Refrain from substance abuse
4. Initiative: Demonstrating a willingness to work.
 Pursue work with energy, drive, and effort to accomplish tasks
 Persist at a task despite interruptions, obstacles, or setbacks
 Take initiative in seeking out new responsibilities and work challenges
 Establish and maintain personally challenging, but realistic work goals
 Strive to exceed standards and expectations
5. Dependability and Reliability: Displaying responsible behaviors at work.
 Behave consistently, predictably, and reliably
 Fulfill obligations, complete assignments, and meet deadlines
 Follow written and verbal directions
 Comply with organizational rules, policies, and procedures
6. Lifelong Learning: Displaying a willingness to learn and apply new knowledge and skills.
 Demonstrate an interest in personal and professional lifelong learning and development
 Treat unexpected circumstances as opportunities to learn and adopt new techniques
 Seek feedback, and modify behavior for improvement
 Broaden knowledge and skills through reading publications, job shadowing, and continuing education
 Use newly learned knowledge and skills to complete specific tasks
 Take charge of personal career development by identifying personal interests and career pathways
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration 5
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
Tier 2—Academic Competencies
1. Reading: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work-related documents.
 Locate, understand, and interpret written technical and non-technical information in documents such
as manuals, reports, memos, graphs, charts, tables, schedules, and signs
 Identify relevant details, facts, specifications, and main ideas
 Understand the essential message and purpose of written materials
 Infer or locate meaning of unknown or technical vocabulary
2. Writing: Using standard English to compile information and prepare written reports.
 Create and edit documents such as protocols, directions, manuals, reports, graphs, and summaries
 Use correct English spelling, grammar, and punctuation to produce logical and accurate written
correspondence, instructions, and documentation
 Communicate thoughts, ideas, information, and messages, which may contain technical material, in a
logical, organized, and coherent manner
 Write words, numbers, sentences, reports, and data using technical terminology and notations
3. Mathematics: Using principles of mathematics such as algebra, geometry, and trigonometry to
solve problems.
Know and apply mathematical principles:
 Number Systems and Relationships – whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and percentages
 Number Operations, Computation, Estimation, and Rounding – addition, subtraction, multiplication,
and division
 Measurement and Estimation – measurement of time, temperature, distances, length, width, height,
perimeter, area, volume, weight, velocity, and speed; unit conversions (e.g., English to metric)
 Mathematical Reasoning and Problem Solving – inductive and deductive reasoning, conjectures,
arguments, strategies, and interpretation of results
 Statistics and Data Analysis – collection, reporting, and analysis of data
 Algebra and Functions – equations, patterns, and functions
 Geometry – shapes and using geometric principles to solve problems
 Trigonometry – triangles and trigonometric functions
4. Science: Knowing and applying scientific principles and methods to solve problems.
Know and apply scientific principles:
 Scientific Method – the systematic pursuit of knowledge involving the recognition and formulation of a
problem, the collection of data through observation and experiment, and the formulation and testing
of a hypothesis
 Laboratory Equipment and Procedures – using a scientific laboratory and its equipment
 Biology – cellular structure, living organisms, structure, function, and interdependence of organisms;
heredity, and evolution
 Biochemistry – the chemical substances and vital processes occurring in living organisms
 Genetics – the mechanisms of hereditary transmission and the variation of inherited
characteristics among similar or related organisms
 Immunology – all aspects of the immune system including its structure and function, disorders of
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
6
the immune system, blood banking, immunization, and organ transplantation
 Microbiology – microorganisms and their effects on other living organisms
 Molecular Biology – biology on a molecular level including the structure, function, and makeup of
biologically important molecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins
 Chemistry – the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic and
molecular systems
 Analytical Chemistry – quantitative and qualitative identification of substances
 Organic Chemistry – the chemistry of carbon compounds
 Physics – matter and energy and physical interactions
5. Communication—Listening and Speaking: Giving full attention to what others are saying and
speaking in English well enough to be understood by others.
Listening
 Receive, attend to, interpret, understand, and respond to verbal messages and other cues
 Apply active listening skills using reflection, restatement, questioning, and clarification
 Pick out important information in verbal messages
 Understand complex instructions
Speaking/Presenting
 Speak clearly and confidently using common English conventions including proper grammar, tone,
and pace
 Express information to individuals or groups taking into account the audience and the nature of the
information (e.g., explain technical concepts to non-technical audiences)
 Present ideas in a persuasive manner
6. Critical and Analytical Thinking: Using logic, reasoning, and analysis to address problems.
 Use interdisciplinary skills to integrate knowledge of various academic disciplines to solve problems
 Use logic and reasoning to identify strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions,
or approaches to problems
 Use inductive and deductive reasoning to analyze, synthesize, compare, and interpret information
 Draw conclusions from relevant or missing information
 Understand the underlying relationship among facts and connections between issues
 Organize problems into manageable parts
7. Basic Computer Skills: Using a computer and related applications to input and retrieve
information.
Basic Computer Knowledge
 Basic computer hardware (e.g. PCs, printers) and software (e.g. word processing software,
spreadsheet software) to perform tasks
 Computer terminology (e.g., program, operating system)
 Fundamental capabilities of computers
 Computer and information security
Applications
 Word Processing – to compose, organize, and edit simple documents and other business
communications
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
7
 Internet and E-mail – to search for information and communicate
 Spreadsheet, database, and presentation software – to store, retrieve, and present data
 Data entry and file storage and management – to store, retrieve, and sort detailed records
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration 8
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
Tier 3—Workplace Competencies
1. Teamwork: Working cooperatively with others to complete work assignments.
 Accept membership in and identify with the goals of a team
 Work effectively with multi-disciplinary teams
 Identify roles of team members and effectively communicate with all members of the team
 Collaborate with others to formulate team objectives and develop consensus for best outcome
 Use teamwork skills to achieve goals, solve problems, and manage conflict
 Give and receive feedback constructively
 Be open to considering new ways of doing things and the merits of new approaches to work
2. Planning and Organizing: Planning and prioritizing work to manage time effectively and
accomplish assigned tasks.
Planning & Organizing
 Approach tasks in a methodical and systematic manner
 Apply effective organizational skills
 Develop and implement a plan for a project
 Keep track of details to ensure work is performed accurately and completely
 Find new ways of organizing or planning work to accomplish tasks more efficiently
Adaptability/Flexibility
 Change gears in response to unpredictable or unexpected events, pressures, situations, and job
demands
 Effectively change plans, goals, actions, or priorities to deal with changing situations
Time Management
 Develop a timeline for sequencing the activities of a project
 Establish specific goals to accomplish work in a timely manner
 Prioritize various competing tasks and perform them efficiently according to their urgency
 Ensure that others receive needed materials in time
 Stay on schedule
 Keep all parties informed of progress and all relevant changes to project timelines
3. Innovative Thinking: Generating inventive solutions.
 Employ unique analyses and generate new, innovative ideas in complex areas
 Reframe problems in a different light to find fresh approaches
 Entertain wide-ranging possibilities to develop unique approaches and useful solutions
 Understand the pieces of a system as a whole and possess a big picture view of the situation
 Integrate seemingly unrelated information to develop creative solutions
 Develop innovative methods of obtaining or using resources when insufficient resources are available
 Demonstrate innovative thinking by using new and existing technology in new ways
 Demonstrate new ways of thinking, not merely about what is, but of what might be
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
9
4. Problem Solving and Decision Making: Applying critical-thinking skills to solve problems by
generating, evaluating, and implementing solutions.
Identify the Problem
 Anticipate or recognize the existence of a problem
 Identify the nature of the problem by analyzing its component parts and defining critical issues
 Locate, obtain, and review information relevant to the problem
Generate Alternatives
 Generate a variety of approaches to the problem
 Think creatively to develop new ideas for and answers to work related problems
 Use logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions,
conclusions, or approaches to problems
 Apply concepts of probability to help make decisions
Choose and Implement a Solution
 Decisively choose the best solution after contemplating available approaches to the problem
 Commit to a solution in a timely manner
 Use strategies, tools, resources, and equipment to implement the solution
 Observe and evaluate the outcomes of implementing the solution to assess the need for alternative
approaches and to identify lessons learned
5. Working with Tools and Technology: Selecting, using, and maintaining tools and technology to
facilitate work activity.
Selection & Application
 Identify, select, and apply tools or technological solutions appropriate to the task at hand
 Identify potential hazards related to the use of tools and equipment
 Operate tools and equipment in accordance with established operating procedures and safety
standards
 Use information technology and computer applications as it supports the gathering, storage,
manipulation, and transfer of data and information
Keeping Current
 Demonstrate an interest in learning about new and emerging tools and technologies
 Identify sources of information concerning state-of-the-art tools, equipment, materials, technologies,
and methodologies
 Seek out opportunities to improve knowledge of tools and technologies that may assist in
streamlining work and improving productivity
Maintenance
 Perform routine maintenance on tools, technology, and equipment
 Determine causes of operating errors and decide what to do about it
 Troubleshoot maintenance problems in accordance with established procedures
6. Checking, Examining, and Recording: Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining
information in written or electronic/magnetic format.
 Use observational techniques for gathering and checking data and controlling processes
 Ensure accuracy of work by checking that all details have been considered
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
10
 Record data with the correct number of significant figures
 Detect and correct errors or inconsistencies, even under time pressure
 Organize records and files to maintain data
7. Business Fundamentals: Knowledge of basic business principles, trends, and economics.
Situational Awareness
 Understand trends in the industry and the company’s position in the market
 Recognize one’s role in the functioning of the company
 Understand the potential impact one’s own performance can have on the success of the organization
 Stay current on organizational strategies to maintain competitiveness
Entrepreneurship
 Develop new ideas for and applications of processes and products
 Seek out and act on opportunities for innovation and invention
Project Management
 Develop, maintain, and abide by project timelines and resource plans and work directly with other
team members to ensure deliverables meet target due dates
 Coordinate and track projects, train project teams, and report performance metrics to supervisors
Customer Focus
 Understand customer needs and goals
 Provide personalized service
 Act professionally with internal or external customers
 Keep customers informed about decisions that affect them
Business Ethics
 Act in the best interest of the company, the community, and the environment
 Comply with applicable laws and rules governing work and report loss, waste, or theft of company
property to appropriate personnel
 Ensure equipment and systems are designed to be environmentally friendly and strive to continually
minimize the resulting carbon footprint
 Practice sustainability by using processes that are non-polluting, conserving of energy and natural
resources, economically efficient, and safe for workers, communities, and consumers
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
11
Tier 4—Industry-Wide Technical Competencies
1. Bioscience Fundamentals: The bioscience industry and its interactions with society.
Critical Work Functions:
 Understand the major application areas of bioscience
 Describe the major technologies and historical development of bioscience
 Explain legal and ethical issues affecting the application of bioscience
 Research emerging and future applications of bioscience
 Understand the social impact of bioscience
 Participate in bioscience industry and professional organizations
Technical Content Areas:
Major Application Areas
 Agricultural Feedstock and Chemicals
 Drugs and Pharmaceuticals
 Medical Devices and Equipment
 Research, Testing, and Medical Laboratories
Major Technologies
 Bioprocessing
 Genetic Engineering
 Bioinformatics
Legal Issues and Ethics
 Intellectual Property
 Documentation
 Patents
 Confidentiality
 Genetics Ethics
 Scientific Accountability
2. Research and Development: Investments toward the creation or discovery of new bioscience
processes, methods, products, and services.
Critical Work Functions:
 Set up and conduct tests/assays: chemical, biological, clinical, environmental, robotic, or mechanical
 Evaluate, document, and report results of experiments and tests
 Prepare documents including experimental protocols, technical reports, and numerical analyses
 Understand the role of pre-clinical and clinical trials in bioscience product development
 Isolate, identify, and prepare specimens for examination
 Clean, sterilize, troubleshoot, calibrate, operate, and maintain lab instruments and equipment
 Participate in the care, use, and inventory of research plants and animals
 Understand and utilize good control and inventory standards
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
12
Technical Content Areas:
Lab Skills
 Experiments, Tests, and Analyses
 Separation Techniques
 Microbiology Techniques
 Cell Biology Techniques
 Nucleic Acid Techniques
 Protein Techniques
 Laboratory Notebooks and Documentation
 Standard Labeling Techniques
 Care For and Use of Plants and Animals
 Laboratory Safety Skills
 Inventory
3. Manufacturing and Production: Processes for the manufacture of bioscience products.
Critical Work Functions:
 Understand upstream and downstream processes and the life cycle of a product
 Perform and monitor the process to make the product or provide the service
 Monitor gauges and recording instruments to ensure that specified conditions are maintained
 Participate in the installation, modification, and upgrade of equipment
 Communicate with co-workers and/or customers to ensure production or service requirements
 Coordinate inventory
 Maintain the production equipment and control systems
 Keep records on process and product
Technical Content Areas:
Procedures
 Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) and Batch Records
 Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP)
 Aseptic Procedures
Production Process
 Obtaining, weighing, measuring, and checking raw materials
 Setting up equipment for the production process
 Cleaning (manual and Clean in Place (CIP)) and sterilization (autoclave and Sterilize in Place (SIP))
 Preparing buffers and solutions
 Inspecting materials at all stages of process to determine quality or condition
 Operating reactors and recovering products
 Purification techniques
 Formulating, filling, and Inspecting product
 Labeling, packaging, and distributing final product
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
13
4. Quality Control and Assurance: Practicing quality control and assurance, and operating under
governmental regulations.
Critical Work Functions:
 Monitor, inspect, and verify quality of the product, procedure, or specimen to ensure compliance with
standards and specifications
 Develop, install, and revise validation procedures and protocols
 Control and maintain documentation about qualification and validation
 Calibrate and validate equipment systems and assess equipment performance
 Revise and update standard operating procedures
 Take and document corrective and preventive action according to Standard Operating Procedures or
as directed
 Know and comply with current federal, state, local, and industry regulations
 Participate in compliance training
Technical Content Areas:
Quality Control/Quality Assurance
 Continuous Improvement
 Audits
 Validation Testing
 Documentation
 Product Specifications
 Statistical and Data Analysis
 Inventory Management
 Test Standards and Controls
 Quality Assurance Logs
 Standard Operating Procedures
 Proficiency Testing
 Plant or Material Flow
Regulatory Compliance
 Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP)
 Federal Regulatory Agencies (including but not limited to):
 U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
 National Institutes of Health (NIH)
 National Research Council (NRC)
 Department of Transportation (DOT)
 Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)
 Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)
 State and Local Regulations
 Industry and Professional Regulations
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
14
5. Health, Safety, and Security: Equipment, practices, and procedures which promote a healthy,
safe, and secure work environment.
Critical Work Functions:
 Demonstrate personal safety, laboratory safety, and security procedures
 Identify first aid supplies, safety personnel, emergency protection areas, and evacuation plans
 Demonstrate appropriate use of personal protective equipment
 Participate in safety and security training and emergency drills
 Identify unsafe or insecure conditions and take corrective action
 Maintain a sanitary and clutter-free lab or work environment
 Monitor, use, store, and dispose of hazardous materials properly
 Follow applicable health, safety, and security regulations
Technical Content Areas:
Laboratory and Industrial Safety
 Safe Use of Laboratory Equipment
 Common Lab or Plant Hazards
 Aseptic and Sterilizing Techniques
 Safety Equipment
 Safety Symbols and Signs
 Emergency Procedures and Protocols
 Electrical and Physical Safety
Hazardous Materials
 Safe Handling and Disposal of Chemical, Biological, and Radioactive Materials
 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
 Chemical Hygiene Plans
 Universal Precautions for Biological Pathogens
Bioscience Security
 Secure Use and Handling of Biological Materials
 Infectious Diseases
 Food Security
 Security Agencies and Regulations
Health and Safety Regulations
 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Other Applicable Health and Safety
Regulations
 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Other Applicable Environmental Protection Regulations
 Worker Protection Standards (WPS)
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration 15
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
Tier 5—Industry Sectors (TBD)
It is beyond the scope of this project to develop competencies around Tier 5 Bioscience Sectors. The industry
sectors described in the study, “Technology, Talent and Capital: State Bioscience Initiatives 2008,” are listed
below to illustrate that the Bioscience Competency Model serves as a foundational resource for all of these
sectors. The sector competencies may be built out by interest groups or communities of practice.
1. Agricultural Feedstock and Chemicals: Applies life sciences knowledge, biochemistry, and
biotechnologies to the processing of agricultural goods and production of organic and agricultural
chemicals. The subsector also includes the emerging activity around the production of biofuels.
Examples of Products
 Fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides
 Ethanol and biodiesel fuels
 Biodegradable materials synthesized from plant-based feedstock
 Sustainable industrial oils and lubricants
 Biocatalysts
 Feed additives and ingredients
 Corn and soybean oil
2. Drugs and Pharmaceuticals: Produces commercially available medicinal and diagnostic
substances. The subsector is generally characterized by large multinational firms heavily
engaged in research and development activities to bring drugs to market.
Examples of Products
 Vaccines
 Oncology, neurology, immunology, and cardiology treatments
 Tissue and cell culture media
 Dermatological/topical treatments
 Diagnostic substances
 Animal therapeutics and vaccines
3. Medical Devices and Equipment: Produces a variety of biomedical instruments and other health
care products and supplies for diagnostics, surgery, patient care, and laboratories. The subsector
is continually advancing the application of electronics and information technologies to improve
and automate testing and patient care capabilities.
Examples of Products
 Bio-imaging equipment
 Surgical supplies and instruments
 Orthopedic and prosthetic implants and devices
 Laser eye surgery instruments
 Automated external defibrillators (AEDs)
 Vascular stents and other implantable devices
 Dental instruments and orthodontics
 Walkers, wheelchairs, and beds
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
16
4. Research, Testing, and Medical Laboratories: Includes a range of activities; from highly research-
oriented companies working to develop and commercialize new drug discovery/delivery systems,
and gene and cell therapies, to more service-oriented firms engaged in medical and other life
sciences testing services.
Examples of Products
 Functional genomics and drug discovery techniques
 Diagnostic testing
 Preclinical drug development
 Stem cell/regenerative research
 Biomarkers
 Nanoscale drug delivery systems
 Research models and laboratory support services
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration 17
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
Resources and Organizations Reviewed
• Association of Clinical Research Professionals
http://www.acrpnet.org/
• BIO: Biotechnology Industry Organization
http://www.bio.org/
• Bioenvironmental Engineering Work Process
Office of Apprenticeship, U.S. Department of Labor
http://www.careeronestop.org/competencymodel//modelFiles/BioEnvironmental%20Engineering.pdf
• Bio-Link
http://www.bio-link.org/index.htm
• Biomanufacturing Skill Standards
Center for Science Education
http://cse.edc.org/products/biomfgskills/charts.asp
• Biomanufacturing Technician Apprenticeship
Office of Apprenticeship, U.S. Department of Labor
http://www.doleta.gov/OA/bul05/Bulletin%202005-22%20(lms)%20Bio-Manufacturing.pdf
• Biomedical Sciences Program
Project Lead the Way
http://www.pltw.org/Biomedical/Curriculum/Curriculum.cfm
• BioOhio
http://www.bioohio.com/
• Bioscience Education Connections
http://www2.edc.org/bec/
• Bioscience Regions
http://bioscienceregions.net/wiki
• Biotech Work Portal (San Diego Workforce Partnership)
http://www.biotechwork.org/
• Biotechnology and Biomedical Skill Standards
Washington State Skill Standards
http://www.wa-skills.com/biotechbiomed.html
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
18
• Biotechnology Austin Competency Analysis Profile
Austin Community College
http://irt.austincc.edu/ids/curriculum/PDFs/BiotechnologyACAP.pdf
• Biotechnology Center Publications
North Carolina Biotechnology Center
http://www.ncbiotech.org/resource_center/publications.html
• Biotechnology Curriculum Framework
Pennsylvania State Department of Education
http://www.pde.state.pa.us/science_tech/cwp/view.asp?A=201&Q=88805
• Biotechnology Institute
http://www.biotechinstitute.org/
• Biotechnology Research and Development (R & D) Pathway Standards & Accountability Criteria
National Consortium on Health Science and Technology Education
http://www.nchste.org/pageimages/ACFC9.pdf
• Biotechnology Skill Standards
BioLink
http://www.bio-link.org/skillstandards.htm
• BioworksU
http://bioworksu.com/
• Career Cluster Resources for Health Science
National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education
http://careerclusters.org/resources/ClusterDocuments/hsdocuments/HSFinal.pdf
• Center for Molecular Biology and Biotechnology at Florida Atlantic University
http://www.science.fau.edu/cmbb/
• Chemical Process Technical Operators
Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council
http://www.ioes.org/media/documents/1729114.pdf
• Clinical Laboratory Science/Biotechnology Cluster
Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council
http://documents.ioes.org/1729115.pdf
• Council for Biotechnology Information
http://www.whybiotech.com/
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
19
• A Delphi Study to Identify Recommended Biotechnology Competencies for First-Year/Initially
Certified Technology Education Teachers
Journal of Technology Education, Vol. 17 No. 2, Spring 2006
http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/v17n2/pdf/scott.pdf
• Energy Biosciences Institute
http://www.energybiosciencesinstitute.org/
• Fierce Biotech: The Biotech Industry’s Daily Monitor
http://www.fiercebiotech.com/
• Health & Biosciences: Jobs and Skill Requirements for Entry-Level Workers 2000-2005
Connecticut Business & Industry Association (CBIA)
http://www.cbia.com/ed/STC/career_explorations/career_explor_info/health_bio.htm
• Health Science and Medical Technology Education Model Curriculum Standards
California State Board of Education
http://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/ctestandards.pdf
• Hemodialysis Technician Austin Competency Analysis Profile
Austin Community College
http://irt.austincc.edu/ids/curriculum/PDFs/HemodialysisTechnicianACAP.pdf
• Laboratory Assisting Competency and Indicator List
Arizona Career and Technical Education
http://www.aztechprep.org/levels/Level-III/AlliedHealth/LabAssist/LAc&i2-03.pdf
• Life Science Informatics Skill Standards
Bellevue Community College
http://bellevuecollege.edu/informatics/SkillStandardsWeb.pdf
• Massachusetts Biotechnology Council
http://www.massbio.org/
• Massachusetts Biotechnology Education Foundation
http://www.massbioed.org/
• Medical Laboratory Technician Work Process
Office of Apprenticeship, U.S. Department of Labor
http://www.careeronestop.org/competencymodel//modelFiles/Medical%20Laboratory%20Technician.pd
f
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
20
• National Association of Scientific Materials Managers
http://www.naosmm.org/
• National Bioscience Industry Skill Standards
Bioscience Education Connections
http://www2.edc.org/bec/standards/gateway/Gateway.htm
• National Center for the Biotechnology Workforce
http://www.biotechworkforce.org/
• NCBIO: The Trade Association for the N.C. Bioscience Industry
http://www.ncbioscience.org/
• North Carolina Biotechnology Center
http://www.ncbiotech.org/
• Northeast Biomanufacturing Center and Collaborative
http://www.biomanufacturing.org/
• Ohio Biotechnology Competency Profile
Center on Education and Training for Employment, The Ohio State University
http://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1b/50/c6.pdf
• Phlebotomy Technician Austin Competency Analysis Profile
Austin Community College
http://irt.austincc.edu/ids/curriculum/PDFs/PhlebotomyTechnicianACAP.pdf
• Pittsburgh Life Sciences Greenhouse
http://www.pittsburghlifesciences.com/
• Skills and Knowledge Standards for Associate Degree in Biotechnology Programs in Indiana
Biomanufacturing.org
http://www.biomanufacturing.org/doc/IN_SkillStandards.doc
• Technology Talent and Capital: State Bioscience Initiatives 2008
http://www.bio.org/local/battelle2008/
• University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute
http://www.umbi.org/home.php
• Utah Skill Certificate Program: Biotechnology
Utah Health Science and Technology Education
http://www.usoe.k12.ut.us/ate/Skills/hst/Biotech/708BiotechStandards.pdf
Bioscience Competency Model
Employment and Training Administration
United States Department of Labor
www.doleta.gov
21
• Virginia Biotechnology Association
http://www.vabio.org/
• Washington Biotechnology & Biomedical Association
http://www.wabio.com/readlist/educ_readlist.htm

Employment and Training Administration 1United States Department of Laborwww.doleta.govBioscience Competency ModelBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training Administration 2United States Department of Laborwww.doleta.govTable of ContentsAbout the Model ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3Tier One: Personal Effectiveness Competencies ………………………………………………. 4Interpersonal Skills ………………………………………………………………………………………. 4Integrity………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4Professionalism ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 4Initiative ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4Dependability and Reliability ………………………………………………………………………. 4Lifelong Learning ………………………………………………………………………………………… 4Tier Two: Academic Competencies ………………………………………………………………….. 5Reading ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 5Writing ………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5Mathematics ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5Science …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5Communication—Listening and Speaking …………………………………………………… 6Critical and Analytical Thinking ………………………………………………………………….. 6Basic Computer Skills ………………………………………………………………………………….. 6Tier Three: Workplace Competencies ………………………………………………………………. 8Teamwork ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8Planning and Organizing …………………………………………………………………………….. 8Innovative Thinking …………………………………………………………………………………….. 8Problem Solving and Decision Making ………………………………………………………… 9Working with Tools and Technology …………………………………………………………… 9Checking, Examining, and Recording ………………………………………………………….. 9Business Fundamentals ……………………………………………………………………………… 10Tier Four: Industry-Wide Technical Competencies ……………………………………….. 11Bioscience Fundamentals …………………………………………………………………………… 11Research and Development ……………………………………………………………………….. 11Manufacturing and Production ………………………………………………………………….. 12Quality Control and Assurance ………………………………………………………………….. 13Health, Safety, and Security ……………………………………………………………………….. 14Tier Five: Industry Sectors ……………………………………………………………………………… 15Resources and Organizations Reviewed ………………………………………………………… 17Bioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training Administration 3United States Department of Laborwww.doleta.govABOUT THE MODELBefore reviewing the Bioscience Competency Model, it may be helpful to understand the model framework.The competency model is depicted in a graphic consisting of nine tiers. The arrangement of the tiers in apyramidal shape is not meant to be hierarchical, or to imply that competencies at the top are at a higher levelof skill. The model’s shape represents the increasing specialization and specificity in the application of skills asyou move up the tiers. Tiers 1-5 are divided into blocks. The blocks represent competency areas, that is, theskills, knowledge, abilities, and other factors essential to successful performance in the Bioscience industry. Atable of the competency definitions and associated key behaviors follows, providing description of thecompetencies.Tiers 1 through 3 contain Foundation Competencies, which form the foundation needed to be ready to enterthe workplace.Tier 1 – Personal Effectiveness Competencies are shown as hovering below the pyramid because thesecompetencies are essential for all life roles. Often referred to as “soft skills,” personal effectivenesscompetencies are generally learned in the home or community and reinforced and honed at school and inthe workplace. They represent personal attributes that may be challenging to teach or assess.Tier 2 – Academic Competencies are critical competencies primarily learned in a school setting. Theyinclude cognitive functions and thinking styles. Academic competencies are likely to apply to allindustries and occupations.Tier 3 – Workplace Competencies represent motives and traits, as well as interpersonal and selfmanagementstyles. They generally are applicable to a large number of occupations and industries.Tiers 4 and 5 contain Industry Competencies, which are specific to an industry or industry sector. Cross-cuttingindustry-wide technical competencies make it possible to create career lattices within an industry wherein aworker can move easily across industry sub-sectors. Rather than narrowly following a single occupationalcareer ladder, this model supports the development of an agile workforce.Tier 4 – Industry-Wide Technical Competencies represent the knowledge and skills that are commonacross sectors within a broader industry. These technical competencies build on, but are more specificthan, competencies represented on lower tiers.Tier 5 – Industry-Sector Technical Competencies represent a sub-set of industry technical competenciesthat are specific to an industry sector.Tiers 6 through 9 represent the specialization that occurs within specific occupations within an industry.Information on occupational competencies is available through O*NET OnLine(http://online.onetcenter.org/).Bioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training Administration 4United States Department of Laborwww.doleta.govTier 1—Personal Effectiveness Competencies1. Interpersonal Skills: Displaying skills to work with others from diverse backgrounds. Work effectively in a multicultural, global environment Respect the opinions, perspectives, customs, and individual differences of others Interact appropriately and respectfully with supervisors and coworkers Use appropriate strategies and solutions for dealing with conflicts and differences to maintain asmooth workflow Utilize emotional intelligence to identify, understand, and manage emotions2. Integrity: Displaying accepted social and work behaviors. Treat others with honesty, fairness, and respect Comply with ethical standards for your field Take responsibility for accomplishing work goals within accepted timeframes Accept responsibility for one’s decisions and actions3. Professionalism: Maintaining a professional demeanor at work. Demonstrate self-control by maintaining composure and dealing calmly with stressful situations Accept criticism and attempt to learn from mistakes Demonstrate a positive attitude towards work Dress appropriately for occupation and maintain appropriate personal hygiene Refrain from substance abuse4. Initiative: Demonstrating a willingness to work. Pursue work with energy, drive, and effort to accomplish tasks Persist at a task despite interruptions, obstacles, or setbacks Take initiative in seeking out new responsibilities and work challenges Establish and maintain personally challenging, but realistic work goals Strive to exceed standards and expectations5. Dependability and Reliability: Displaying responsible behaviors at work. Behave consistently, predictably, and reliably Fulfill obligations, complete assignments, and meet deadlines Follow written and verbal directions Comply with organizational rules, policies, and procedures6. Lifelong Learning: Displaying a willingness to learn and apply new knowledge and skills. Demonstrate an interest in personal and professional lifelong learning and development Treat unexpected circumstances as opportunities to learn and adopt new techniques Seek feedback, and modify behavior for improvement Broaden knowledge and skills through reading publications, job shadowing, and continuing education Use newly learned knowledge and skills to complete specific tasks Take charge of personal career development by identifying personal interests and career pathwaysBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training Administration 5United States Department of Laborwww.doleta.govTier 2—Academic Competencies1. Reading: Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work-related documents. Locate, understand, and interpret written technical and non-technical information in documents suchas manuals, reports, memos, graphs, charts, tables, schedules, and signs Identify relevant details, facts, specifications, and main ideas Understand the essential message and purpose of written materials Infer or locate meaning of unknown or technical vocabulary2. Writing: Using standard English to compile information and prepare written reports. Create and edit documents such as protocols, directions, manuals, reports, graphs, and summaries Use correct English spelling, grammar, and punctuation to produce logical and accurate writtencorrespondence, instructions, and documentation Communicate thoughts, ideas, information, and messages, which may contain technical material, in alogical, organized, and coherent manner Write words, numbers, sentences, reports, and data using technical terminology and notations3. Mathematics: Using principles of mathematics such as algebra, geometry, and trigonometry tosolve problems.Know and apply mathematical principles: Number Systems and Relationships – whole numbers, decimals, fractions, and percentages Number Operations, Computation, Estimation, and Rounding – addition, subtraction, multiplication,and division Measurement and Estimation – measurement of time, temperature, distances, length, width, height,perimeter, area, volume, weight, velocity, and speed; unit conversions (e.g., English to metric) Mathematical Reasoning and Problem Solving – inductive and deductive reasoning, conjectures,arguments, strategies, and interpretation of results Statistics and Data Analysis – collection, reporting, and analysis of data Algebra and Functions – equations, patterns, and functions Geometry – shapes and using geometric principles to solve problems Trigonometry – triangles and trigonometric functions4. Science: Knowing and applying scientific principles and methods to solve problems.Know and apply scientific principles: Scientific Method – the systematic pursuit of knowledge involving the recognition and formulation of aproblem, the collection of data through observation and experiment, and the formulation and testingof a hypothesis Laboratory Equipment and Procedures – using a scientific laboratory and its equipment Biology – cellular structure, living organisms, structure, function, and interdependence of organisms;heredity, and evolution Biochemistry – the chemical substances and vital processes occurring in living organisms Genetics – the mechanisms of hereditary transmission and the variation of inheritedcharacteristics among similar or related organisms Immunology – all aspects of the immune system including its structure and function, disorders ofBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov6the immune system, blood banking, immunization, and organ transplantation Microbiology – microorganisms and their effects on other living organisms Molecular Biology – biology on a molecular level including the structure, function, and makeup ofbiologically important molecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins Chemistry – the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic andmolecular systems Analytical Chemistry – quantitative and qualitative identification of substances Organic Chemistry – the chemistry of carbon compounds Physics – matter and energy and physical interactions5. Communication—Listening and Speaking: Giving full attention to what others are saying andspeaking in English well enough to be understood by others.Listening Receive, attend to, interpret, understand, and respond to verbal messages and other cues Apply active listening skills using reflection, restatement, questioning, and clarification Pick out important information in verbal messages Understand complex instructionsSpeaking/Presenting Speak clearly and confidently using common English conventions including proper grammar, tone,and pace Express information to individuals or groups taking into account the audience and the nature of theinformation (e.g., explain technical concepts to non-technical audiences) Present ideas in a persuasive manner6. Critical and Analytical Thinking: Using logic, reasoning, and analysis to address problems. Use interdisciplinary skills to integrate knowledge of various academic disciplines to solve problems Use logic and reasoning to identify strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions,or approaches to problems Use inductive and deductive reasoning to analyze, synthesize, compare, and interpret information Draw conclusions from relevant or missing information Understand the underlying relationship among facts and connections between issues Organize problems into manageable parts7. Basic Computer Skills: Using a computer and related applications to input and retrieveinformation.Basic Computer Knowledge Basic computer hardware (e.g. PCs, printers) and software (e.g. word processing software,spreadsheet software) to perform tasks Computer terminology (e.g., program, operating system) Fundamental capabilities of computers Computer and information securityApplications Word Processing – to compose, organize, and edit simple documents and other businesscommunicationsBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov7 Internet and E-mail – to search for information and communicate Spreadsheet, database, and presentation software – to store, retrieve, and present data Data entry and file storage and management – to store, retrieve, and sort detailed recordsBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training Administration 8United States Department of Laborwww.doleta.govTier 3—Workplace Competencies1. Teamwork: Working cooperatively with others to complete work assignments. Accept membership in and identify with the goals of a team Work effectively with multi-disciplinary teams Identify roles of team members and effectively communicate with all members of the team Collaborate with others to formulate team objectives and develop consensus for best outcome Use teamwork skills to achieve goals, solve problems, and manage conflict Give and receive feedback constructively Be open to considering new ways of doing things and the merits of new approaches to work2. Planning and Organizing: Planning and prioritizing work to manage time effectively andaccomplish assigned tasks.Planning & Organizing Approach tasks in a methodical and systematic manner Apply effective organizational skills Develop and implement a plan for a project Keep track of details to ensure work is performed accurately and completely Find new ways of organizing or planning work to accomplish tasks more efficientlyAdaptability/Flexibility Change gears in response to unpredictable or unexpected events, pressures, situations, and jobdemands Effectively change plans, goals, actions, or priorities to deal with changing situationsTime Management Develop a timeline for sequencing the activities of a project Establish specific goals to accomplish work in a timely manner Prioritize various competing tasks and perform them efficiently according to their urgency Ensure that others receive needed materials in time Stay on schedule Keep all parties informed of progress and all relevant changes to project timelines3. Innovative Thinking: Generating inventive solutions. Employ unique analyses and generate new, innovative ideas in complex areas Reframe problems in a different light to find fresh approaches Entertain wide-ranging possibilities to develop unique approaches and useful solutions Understand the pieces of a system as a whole and possess a big picture view of the situation Integrate seemingly unrelated information to develop creative solutions Develop innovative methods of obtaining or using resources when insufficient resources are available Demonstrate innovative thinking by using new and existing technology in new ways Demonstrate new ways of thinking, not merely about what is, but of what might beBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov94. Problem Solving and Decision Making: Applying critical-thinking skills to solve problems bygenerating, evaluating, and implementing solutions.Identify the Problem Anticipate or recognize the existence of a problem Identify the nature of the problem by analyzing its component parts and defining critical issues Locate, obtain, and review information relevant to the problemGenerate Alternatives Generate a variety of approaches to the problem Think creatively to develop new ideas for and answers to work related problems Use logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions,conclusions, or approaches to problems Apply concepts of probability to help make decisionsChoose and Implement a Solution Decisively choose the best solution after contemplating available approaches to the problem Commit to a solution in a timely manner Use strategies, tools, resources, and equipment to implement the solution Observe and evaluate the outcomes of implementing the solution to assess the need for alternativeapproaches and to identify lessons learned5. Working with Tools and Technology: Selecting, using, and maintaining tools and technology tofacilitate work activity.Selection & Application Identify, select, and apply tools or technological solutions appropriate to the task at hand Identify potential hazards related to the use of tools and equipment Operate tools and equipment in accordance with established operating procedures and safetystandards Use information technology and computer applications as it supports the gathering, storage,manipulation, and transfer of data and informationKeeping Current Demonstrate an interest in learning about new and emerging tools and technologies Identify sources of information concerning state-of-the-art tools, equipment, materials, technologies,and methodologies Seek out opportunities to improve knowledge of tools and technologies that may assist instreamlining work and improving productivityMaintenance Perform routine maintenance on tools, technology, and equipment Determine causes of operating errors and decide what to do about it Troubleshoot maintenance problems in accordance with established procedures6. Checking, Examining, and Recording: Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaininginformation in written or electronic/magnetic format. Use observational techniques for gathering and checking data and controlling processes Ensure accuracy of work by checking that all details have been consideredBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov10 Record data with the correct number of significant figures Detect and correct errors or inconsistencies, even under time pressure Organize records and files to maintain data7. Business Fundamentals: Knowledge of basic business principles, trends, and economics.Situational Awareness Understand trends in the industry and the company’s position in the market Recognize one’s role in the functioning of the company Understand the potential impact one’s own performance can have on the success of the organization Stay current on organizational strategies to maintain competitivenessEntrepreneurship Develop new ideas for and applications of processes and products Seek out and act on opportunities for innovation and inventionProject Management Develop, maintain, and abide by project timelines and resource plans and work directly with otherteam members to ensure deliverables meet target due dates Coordinate and track projects, train project teams, and report performance metrics to supervisorsCustomer Focus Understand customer needs and goals Provide personalized service Act professionally with internal or external customers Keep customers informed about decisions that affect themBusiness Ethics Act in the best interest of the company, the community, and the environment Comply with applicable laws and rules governing work and report loss, waste, or theft of companyproperty to appropriate personnel Ensure equipment and systems are designed to be environmentally friendly and strive to continuallyminimize the resulting carbon footprint Practice sustainability by using processes that are non-polluting, conserving of energy and naturalresources, economically efficient, and safe for workers, communities, and consumersBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov11Tier 4—Industry-Wide Technical Competencies1. Bioscience Fundamentals: The bioscience industry and its interactions with society.Critical Work Functions: Understand the major application areas of bioscience Describe the major technologies and historical development of bioscience Explain legal and ethical issues affecting the application of bioscience Research emerging and future applications of bioscience Understand the social impact of bioscience Participate in bioscience industry and professional organizationsTechnical Content Areas:Major Application Areas Agricultural Feedstock and Chemicals Drugs and Pharmaceuticals Medical Devices and Equipment Research, Testing, and Medical LaboratoriesMajor Technologies Bioprocessing Genetic Engineering BioinformaticsLegal Issues and Ethics Intellectual Property Documentation Patents Confidentiality Genetics Ethics Scientific Accountability2. Research and Development: Investments toward the creation or discovery of new bioscienceprocesses, methods, products, and services.Critical Work Functions: Set up and conduct tests/assays: chemical, biological, clinical, environmental, robotic, or mechanical Evaluate, document, and report results of experiments and tests Prepare documents including experimental protocols, technical reports, and numerical analyses Understand the role of pre-clinical and clinical trials in bioscience product development Isolate, identify, and prepare specimens for examination Clean, sterilize, troubleshoot, calibrate, operate, and maintain lab instruments and equipment Participate in the care, use, and inventory of research plants and animals Understand and utilize good control and inventory standardsBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov12Technical Content Areas:Lab Skills Experiments, Tests, and Analyses Separation Techniques Microbiology Techniques Cell Biology Techniques Nucleic Acid Techniques Protein Techniques Laboratory Notebooks and Documentation Standard Labeling Techniques Care For and Use of Plants and Animals Laboratory Safety Skills Inventory3. Manufacturing and Production: Processes for the manufacture of bioscience products.Critical Work Functions: Understand upstream and downstream processes and the life cycle of a product Perform and monitor the process to make the product or provide the service Monitor gauges and recording instruments to ensure that specified conditions are maintained Participate in the installation, modification, and upgrade of equipment Communicate with co-workers and/or customers to ensure production or service requirements Coordinate inventory Maintain the production equipment and control systems Keep records on process and productTechnical Content Areas:Procedures Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) and Batch Records Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) Aseptic ProceduresProduction Process Obtaining, weighing, measuring, and checking raw materials Setting up equipment for the production process Cleaning (manual and Clean in Place (CIP)) and sterilization (autoclave and Sterilize in Place (SIP)) Preparing buffers and solutions Inspecting materials at all stages of process to determine quality or condition Operating reactors and recovering products Purification techniques Formulating, filling, and Inspecting product Labeling, packaging, and distributing final productBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov134. Quality Control and Assurance: Practicing quality control and assurance, and operating undergovernmental regulations.Critical Work Functions: Monitor, inspect, and verify quality of the product, procedure, or specimen to ensure compliance withstandards and specifications Develop, install, and revise validation procedures and protocols Control and maintain documentation about qualification and validation Calibrate and validate equipment systems and assess equipment performance Revise and update standard operating procedures Take and document corrective and preventive action according to Standard Operating Procedures oras directed Know and comply with current federal, state, local, and industry regulations Participate in compliance trainingTechnical Content Areas:Quality Control/Quality Assurance Continuous Improvement Audits Validation Testing Documentation Product Specifications Statistical and Data Analysis Inventory Management Test Standards and Controls Quality Assurance Logs Standard Operating Procedures Proficiency Testing Plant or Material FlowRegulatory Compliance Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) and Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) Federal Regulatory Agencies (including but not limited to): U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Research Council (NRC) Department of Transportation (DOT) Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) State and Local Regulations Industry and Professional RegulationsBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov145. Health, Safety, and Security: Equipment, practices, and procedures which promote a healthy,safe, and secure work environment.Critical Work Functions: Demonstrate personal safety, laboratory safety, and security procedures Identify first aid supplies, safety personnel, emergency protection areas, and evacuation plans Demonstrate appropriate use of personal protective equipment Participate in safety and security training and emergency drills Identify unsafe or insecure conditions and take corrective action Maintain a sanitary and clutter-free lab or work environment Monitor, use, store, and dispose of hazardous materials properly Follow applicable health, safety, and security regulationsTechnical Content Areas:Laboratory and Industrial Safety Safe Use of Laboratory Equipment Common Lab or Plant Hazards Aseptic and Sterilizing Techniques Safety Equipment Safety Symbols and Signs Emergency Procedures and Protocols Electrical and Physical SafetyHazardous Materials Safe Handling and Disposal of Chemical, Biological, and Radioactive Materials Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) Chemical Hygiene Plans Universal Precautions for Biological PathogensBioscience Security Secure Use and Handling of Biological Materials Infectious Diseases Food Security Security Agencies and RegulationsHealth and Safety Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Other Applicable Health and SafetyRegulations Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Other Applicable Environmental Protection Regulations Worker Protection Standards (WPS)Bioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training Administration 15United States Department of Laborwww.doleta.govTier 5—Industry Sectors (TBD)It is beyond the scope of this project to develop competencies around Tier 5 Bioscience Sectors. The industrysectors described in the study, “Technology, Talent and Capital: State Bioscience Initiatives 2008,” are listedbelow to illustrate that the Bioscience Competency Model serves as a foundational resource for all of thesesectors. The sector competencies may be built out by interest groups or communities of practice.1. Agricultural Feedstock and Chemicals: Applies life sciences knowledge, biochemistry, andbiotechnologies to the processing of agricultural goods and production of organic and agriculturalchemicals. The subsector also includes the emerging activity around the production of biofuels.Examples of Products Fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides Ethanol and biodiesel fuels Biodegradable materials synthesized from plant-based feedstock Sustainable industrial oils and lubricants Biocatalysts Feed additives and ingredients Corn and soybean oil2. Drugs and Pharmaceuticals: Produces commercially available medicinal and diagnosticsubstances. The subsector is generally characterized by large multinational firms heavilyengaged in research and development activities to bring drugs to market.Examples of Products Vaccines Oncology, neurology, immunology, and cardiology treatments Tissue and cell culture media Dermatological/topical treatments Diagnostic substances Animal therapeutics and vaccines3. Medical Devices and Equipment: Produces a variety of biomedical instruments and other healthcare products and supplies for diagnostics, surgery, patient care, and laboratories. The subsectoris continually advancing the application of electronics and information technologies to improveand automate testing and patient care capabilities.Examples of Products Bio-imaging equipment Surgical supplies and instruments Orthopedic and prosthetic implants and devices Laser eye surgery instruments Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) Vascular stents and other implantable devices Dental instruments and orthodontics Walkers, wheelchairs, and bedsBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov164. Research, Testing, and Medical Laboratories: Includes a range of activities; from highly research-oriented companies working to develop and commercialize new drug discovery/delivery systems,and gene and cell therapies, to more service-oriented firms engaged in medical and other lifesciences testing services.Examples of Products Functional genomics and drug discovery techniques Diagnostic testing Preclinical drug development Stem cell/regenerative research Biomarkers Nanoscale drug delivery systems Research models and laboratory support servicesBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training Administration 17United States Department of Laborwww.doleta.govResources and Organizations Reviewed• Association of Clinical Research Professionalshttp://www.acrpnet.org/• BIO: Biotechnology Industry Organizationhttp://www.bio.org/• Bioenvironmental Engineering Work ProcessOffice of Apprenticeship, U.S. Department of Laborhttp://www.careeronestop.org/competencymodel//modelFiles/BioEnvironmental%20Engineering.pdf• Bio-Linkhttp://www.bio-link.org/index.htm• Biomanufacturing Skill StandardsCenter for Science Educationhttp://cse.edc.org/products/biomfgskills/charts.asp• Biomanufacturing Technician ApprenticeshipOffice of Apprenticeship, U.S. Department of Laborhttp://www.doleta.gov/OA/bul05/Bulletin%202005-22%20(lms)%20Bio-Manufacturing.pdf• Biomedical Sciences ProgramProject Lead the Wayhttp://www.pltw.org/Biomedical/Curriculum/Curriculum.cfm• BioOhiohttp://www.bioohio.com/• Bioscience Education Connectionshttp://www2.edc.org/bec/• Bioscience Regionshttp://bioscienceregions.net/wiki• Biotech Work Portal (San Diego Workforce Partnership)http://www.biotechwork.org/• Biotechnology and Biomedical Skill StandardsWashington State Skill Standardshttp://www.wa-skills.com/biotechbiomed.htmlBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov18• Biotechnology Austin Competency Analysis ProfileAustin Community Collegehttp://irt.austincc.edu/ids/curriculum/PDFs/BiotechnologyACAP.pdf• Biotechnology Center PublicationsNorth Carolina Biotechnology Centerhttp://www.ncbiotech.org/resource_center/publications.html• Biotechnology Curriculum FrameworkPennsylvania State Department of Educationhttp://www.pde.state.pa.us/science_tech/cwp/view.asp?A=201&Q=88805• Biotechnology Institutehttp://www.biotechinstitute.org/• Biotechnology Research and Development (R & D) Pathway Standards & Accountability CriteriaNational Consortium on Health Science and Technology Educationhttp://www.nchste.org/pageimages/ACFC9.pdf• Biotechnology Skill StandardsBioLinkhttp://www.bio-link.org/skillstandards.htm• BioworksUhttp://bioworksu.com/• Career Cluster Resources for Health ScienceNational Association of State Directors of Career Technical Educationhttp://careerclusters.org/resources/ClusterDocuments/hsdocuments/HSFinal.pdf• Center for Molecular Biology and Biotechnology at Florida Atlantic Universityhttp://www.science.fau.edu/cmbb/• Chemical Process Technical OperatorsIllinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Councilhttp://www.ioes.org/media/documents/1729114.pdf• Clinical Laboratory Science/Biotechnology ClusterIllinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Councilhttp://documents.ioes.org/1729115.pdf• Council for Biotechnology Informationhttp://www.whybiotech.com/Bioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov19• A Delphi Study to Identify Recommended Biotechnology Competencies for First-Year/InitiallyCertified Technology Education TeachersJournal of Technology Education, Vol. 17 No. 2, Spring 2006http://scholar.lib.vt.edu/ejournals/JTE/v17n2/pdf/scott.pdf• Energy Biosciences Institutehttp://www.energybiosciencesinstitute.org/• Fierce Biotech: The Biotech Industry’s Daily Monitorhttp://www.fiercebiotech.com/• Health & Biosciences: Jobs and Skill Requirements for Entry-Level Workers 2000-2005Connecticut Business & Industry Association (CBIA)http://www.cbia.com/ed/STC/career_explorations/career_explor_info/health_bio.htm• Health Science and Medical Technology Education Model Curriculum StandardsCalifornia State Board of Educationhttp://www.cde.ca.gov/ci/ct/sf/documents/ctestandards.pdf• Hemodialysis Technician Austin Competency Analysis ProfileAustin Community Collegehttp://irt.austincc.edu/ids/curriculum/PDFs/HemodialysisTechnicianACAP.pdf• Laboratory Assisting Competency and Indicator ListArizona Career and Technical Educationhttp://www.aztechprep.org/levels/Level-III/AlliedHealth/LabAssist/LAc&i2-03.pdf• Life Science Informatics Skill StandardsBellevue Community Collegehttp://bellevuecollege.edu/informatics/SkillStandardsWeb.pdf• Massachusetts Biotechnology Councilhttp://www.massbio.org/• Massachusetts Biotechnology Education Foundationhttp://www.massbioed.org/• Medical Laboratory Technician Work ProcessOffice of Apprenticeship, U.S. Department of Laborhttp://www.careeronestop.org/competencymodel//modelFiles/Medical%20Laboratory%20Technician.pdfBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov20• National Association of Scientific Materials Managershttp://www.naosmm.org/• National Bioscience Industry Skill StandardsBioscience Education Connectionshttp://www2.edc.org/bec/standards/gateway/Gateway.htm• National Center for the Biotechnology Workforcehttp://www.biotechworkforce.org/• NCBIO: The Trade Association for the N.C. Bioscience Industryhttp://www.ncbioscience.org/• North Carolina Biotechnology Centerhttp://www.ncbiotech.org/• Northeast Biomanufacturing Center and Collaborativehttp://www.biomanufacturing.org/• Ohio Biotechnology Competency ProfileCenter on Education and Training for Employment, The Ohio State Universityhttp://eric.ed.gov/ERICDocs/data/ericdocs2sql/content_storage_01/0000019b/80/1b/50/c6.pdf• Phlebotomy Technician Austin Competency Analysis ProfileAustin Community Collegehttp://irt.austincc.edu/ids/curriculum/PDFs/PhlebotomyTechnicianACAP.pdf• Pittsburgh Life Sciences Greenhousehttp://www.pittsburghlifesciences.com/• Skills and Knowledge Standards for Associate Degree in Biotechnology Programs in IndianaBiomanufacturing.orghttp://www.biomanufacturing.org/doc/IN_SkillStandards.doc• Technology Talent and Capital: State Bioscience Initiatives 2008http://www.bio.org/local/battelle2008/• University of Maryland Biotechnology Institutehttp://www.umbi.org/home.php• Utah Skill Certificate Program: BiotechnologyUtah Health Science and Technology Educationhttp://www.usoe.k12.ut.us/ate/Skills/hst/Biotech/708BiotechStandards.pdfBioscience Competency ModelEmployment and Training AdministrationUnited States Department of Laborwww.doleta.gov21• Virginia Biotechnology Associationhttp://www.vabio.org/• Washington Biotechnology & Biomedical Associationhttp://www.wabio.com/readlist/educ_readlist.htm

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medications. Researchers work to design and
perform research experiments at the molecular
level through detailed manipulation, observation,
data analysis, and interpretation. After
performing experiments, these professionals
analyze the data and interpret the results.
BIOINFORMATICS
Bioinformatics professionals build the
technological tools that are needed to improve
the data analysis process for large data sets. In
short, workers in the bioinformatics job group
use advanced mathematical algorithms and
computer science to organize, analyze, and
interpret biological data.
SCIENTIST/PHARMACOLOGIST
Qualifications:
M.S. or Ph.D. in Biology
Salary Range:
$60,000 – $120,000
BIOINFORMATICS SCIENTIST
Qualifications:
M.S. or Ph.D. in Statistics/Biostatistics
Salary Range:
$85,000 – $110,000
LABORATORY ASSISTANT
Qualifications:
High School Diploma
Salary Range:
$25,000 – $45,000
ANALYST
Qualifications:
B.S. in Computer Science, Mathematics,
Bioinformatics, or Molecular Biology
Salary Range:
$25,000 – $35,000
JOB GROUPS
EXAMPLE OCCUPATIONS
MEDICAL EXPERT
Medical experts provide
support services throughout
pharmaceutical companies.
They provide training for
clinical staff and use their
medical expertise to consult
marketing, sales, and
regulatory affairs teams.
CLINICAL RESEARCH
Workers in the clinical
research group carry out
clinical trials, analyze
data, and interpret results
to make recommendations
about whether new
products should go to
market.
BIOSTATISTICS
Scientists who engage in
clinical trials are often
supported by specialists who
are skilled in applying
advanced statistics in the
analysis of diverse data sets.
Scientists in this area use their
expertise to guide the experimental
design, data collection
effort, and analysis.
MEDICAL WRITER
Clinical trial procedures and
outcomes must be well documented
to protect the company, trial
participants, and consumers.
Medical writers work with researchers
and administrators to develop
written documents for regulatory
approval, scientific journals,
conferences, and marketing
initiatives.
CLINICAL TRIAL RECRUITMENT
Before a drug can go to market, the
developing organization must
demonstrate that it is effective and
safe for human consumption.
Managing the clinical trial process
requires workers who will be able to
develop and carry out a participant
recruitment plan and work directly
with participants.
MEDICAL EXPERT
Qualifications:
M.S. or Ph.D. in Science
(e.g., Biology)
Salary Range:
$120,000 – $200,000
DIRECTOR OF CLINICAL
RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT
Qualifications:
M.S. or Ph.D. in Science
(e.g., Biology)
Salary Range:
$150,000 – $200,000
DIRECTOR OF CLINICAL
BIOSTATISTICS
Qualifications:
M.S. or Ph.D. in
Biological/Biomedical
Sciences
Salary Range:
$120,000 – $200,000
PROTOCOL DEVELOPMENT
SCIENTIST
Qualifications:
B.S. or M.S. in
Biological/Biomedical
Sciences or R.N.
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $200,000
DIRECTOR OF CLINICAL
PROJECTS MANAGEMENT
Qualifications:
B.S. or M.S. in Science
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $200,000
CLINICAL RESEARCH
ASSOCIATE
Qualifications:
B.S. in Biological/Biomedical
Sciences or R.N.
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
BIOSTATISTICS
ASSOCIATE
Qualifications:
B.S. in Biological/Biomedical
Sciences
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $110,000
MEDICAL WRITER
Qualifications:
M.S. in Science
(e.g., Biology) or R.N.
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $110,000
CLINICAL TRIAL ASSOCIATE
Qualifications:
B.S. in Science or R.N.
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
JOB GROUPS
EXAMPLE OCCUPATIONS
INFORMATION
SYSTEMS
Workers in this area
provide technical support,
computer software and
hardware installation,
system management, and
maintenance of computer
systems.
BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT
Workers in this job group
engage in the preparation,
negotiation, and management
of contracts that have been
secured. In addition, workers in
this area identify strategic
alliances for future contracts
and licensure.
FINANCE/
ACCOUNTING
Workers in this job group
keep track of the financial
operations of the organization.
They track financial
systems such as external
contracts, employee
compensation, and stocks.
LEGAL
Many of the functional areas in
bioscience companies benefit from
legal advice when entering into
contracts and agreements with
everyone from clinical trial
participants to material suppliers.
In addition, these professionals
may also help to prepare patent
filings for the company.
HUMAN RESOURCES
Human resources professionals support
organizational goals through the
management of personnel. Employees
in this group usually work in a
specialized area. Key areas in most
large firms include employee relations,
compensation, benefits, training, and
equal employment opportunity.
CHIEF INFORMATION
OFFICER
Qualifications:
B.S./M.S. in Computer
Science, Information
Technology, Business
Administration, or a Related
Field
Salary Range:
$150,000 – $250,000
COMMUNICATIONS
Communications
specialists support
organizational relations
with the public and
investors. These individuals
work to increase
public awareness of
company activities and
scientific contributions.
CORPORATE
COMMUNICATIONS
MANAGER
Qualifications:
B.A. in Communications,
English, or Business Related
Field
Salary Range:
$100,000 – $150,000
INFORMATION SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
Qualifications:
High School Diploma
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
COMMUNICATIONS
SPECIALIST
Qualifications:
B.S. or B.A. in
Communications or Business
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
MANAGER
Qualifications:
B.S. in Marketing/
Business
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $100,000
FINANCE ACCOUNTING
MANAGER
Qualifications:
B.S. in Accounting,
Finance
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $100,000
LEGAL COUNSEL
Qualifications:
Law Degree
Salary Range:
$150,000 – $250,000
HUMAN RESOURCES
MANAGER
Qualifications:
B.S. in Human Resources or
Related Business Field
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $100,000
CONTRACTS
ADMINISTRATOR
Qualifications:
B.S. in Business
Salary Range:
$50,000 – $80,000
FINANCIAL ANALYST
Qualifications:
B.S. in Finance Accounting
Salary Range:
$50,000 – $80,000
PARALEGAL
Qualifications:
B.S. Degree
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
HUMAN RESOURCES
REPRESENTATIVE
Qualifications:
B.S. in Human Resources or
Related Business Field
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
JOB GROUPS
EXAMPLE OCCUPATIONS
QUALITY ASSURANCE
Workers in the quality
assurance job group take the
first steps to minimize product
defects by establishing
specific guidelines for the
manufacturing process.
Workers in this area manage
and participate in the review
of the manufacturing
procedures.
QUALITY CONTROL
Once the process for
manufacturing has been
outlined and implemented,
workers in the area of quality
control work to make sure
that the raw materials,
equipment, and applied
process all meet both
internal and external
standards.
VALIDATION
Validation specialists
develop, implement, and
manage testing plans and
methods to ensure that
the manufacturing
procedures and resulting
products meet regulatory
requirements.
DISPENSARY/
MEASUREMENT
In order for the products to be
manufactured, the large
quantities of materials must
be scaled down to sizes that
are needed for individual
production. Workers in this
area need a solid understanding
of measurement.
QUALITY ASSURANCE
MANAGER
Qualifications:
B.S. in Biological/Biomedical
Science
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $120,000
QUALITY ASSURANCE
DOCUMENTATION
ADMINISTRATOR
Qualifications:
High School Diploma
Salary Range:
$30,000 – $50,000
QUALITY CONTROL
ENGINEER/SUPERVISOR
Qualifications:
B.S./M.S. in Engineering
Salary Range:
$60,000 – $120,000
VALIDATION DIRECTOR
Qualifications:
B.S./M.S. in Science (e.g., Biology,
Chemistry, Engineering)
Salary Range:
$120,000 – $200,000
SENIOR TECHNICIAN
Qualifications:
Experience in Measurement
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
QUALITY CONTROL
TECHNICIAN
Qualifications:
High School Diploma
Salary Range:
$35,000 – $60,000
VALIDATION SPECIALIST
Qualifications:
B.S./M.S. in Science
(e.g., Biology, Chemistry,
Engineering)
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
REGULATORY
Workers in the regulatory affairs job group
ensure that the product development
process and the final product meet the
requirements of various regulating
agencies. These workers prepare procedural
documentation, ensure that the correct
paperwork is submitted to the proper
agencies, and notify employees within the
organizations of required policies and
procedures.
MANAGER REGULATORY AFFAIRS
Qualifications:
(B.S./M.S. in Science
(e.g., Biology, Chemistry, Engineering)
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $120,000
REGULATORY AFFAIRS ASSOCIATE
Qualifications:
B.S. in Science
(e.g., Biology, Chemistry, Engineering)
Salary Range:
$30,000 – $50,000
DISPENSARY TECHNICIAN
Qualifications:
Experience in Measurement
Salary Range:
$30,000 – $50,000
JOB GROUPS
EXAMPLE OCCUPATIONS
PLANNING & SUPPLIER
MANAGEMENT
Workers involved with
planning and supplier
management ensure that the
organization is aware of the
market trends that may
influence production. In
addition, they manage the
vendors who supply the raw
materials used in drug
production.
PRODUCTION &
OPERATIONS
Workers involved in production and
operations follow strict processes in the
assessment of test samples, purification
procedures, and maintenance of
advanced equipment. In addition,
organizations must ensure that the raw
materials needed at various stages of
production are available.
TRANSPORTATION &
DISTRIBUTION
Products must be made available to
customers. There are many workers in an
organization that are involved in the
process of putting shipments together and
transporting them to customers. For
example, workers must package and
monitor shipments and make sure that the
company is following all of the state laws
associated with transporting of goods.
FACILITIES
Workers in this area maintain
facility equipment and space to
ensure that all safety standards
are met. In addition, they
provide guidance to develop
standard operating procedures.
DIRECTOR OF PLANNING
& FORECASTING
Qualifications:
Ph.D. in Science
(e.g., Biology, Chemistry,
Engineering)
Salary Range:
$150,000 – $200,000
PLANNER
Qualifications:
B.S. in Science
(e.g., Biology, Chemistry,
Engineering)
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
MANUFACTURING SUPERVISOR
Qualifications:
B.S. in Science
(e.g., Biology, Chemistry,
Engineering)
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $120,000
TRANSPORTATION ANALYST
Qualifications:
High School Diploma/
B.S. in Business
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
SENIOR ENGINEER
Qualifications:
B.S. in Engineering
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $120,000
MANUFACTURING TECHNICIAN
Qualifications:
High School Diploma
Salary Range:
$40,000 – $80,000
WAREHOUSE TECHNICIAN
Qualifications:
High School Diploma
Salary Range:
$30,000 – $40,000
FACILITIES TECHNICIAN
Qualifications:
A.A./A.S. in Mechanical/
Electrical Field
Salary Range:
$30,000 – $40,000
JOB GROUPS
EXAMPLE OCCUPATIONS
MARKETING
Marketing specialists use their expertise
to provide recommendations for activities
such as product packaging, marketing
budgets, product launches, and product
expansion.
SALES
Those working in the sales job group
provide technical assistance and
information to customers, the medical
and scientific community, and
pharmaceutical employees.
MARKETING RESEARCH MANAGER
Qualifications:
B.S. in Marketing or Business,
MBA preferred
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $120,000
MEDICAL/CLINICAL SCIENCE LIAISON
Qualifications:
B.S. in Science (e.g., Biology, Chemistry,
Engineering), MBA preferred
Salary Range:
$80,000 – $120,000
MEDICAL INFORMATION SPECIALIST
Qualifications:
B.S. in Pharmacy or Nursing or M.S./Ph.D.
Salary Range:
$30,000 – $70,000
SALES REPRESENTATIVE
Qualifications:
B.S./M.S. in related Scientific Discipline
(e.g., Biology), Marketing, or Communications
Salary Range:
$30,000 – $120,000
Visit www.bio-one.org for job information, career videos, and links to the universities and colleges that can prepare you for work in the biosciences.
DR
CD QR
B
SM
MS
clinical
DEVELOPMENT
manufacturing supply chain
quality
CONTROL
regulatory
AFFAIRS
sales
& MARKETING
discovery
RESEARCH & bio-business

job families EXPLORATIONJOB GROUPSEXAMPLE OCCUPATIONSgetgrowing CAREER PATHS WWW.BIO-ONE.ORGLEARN MORE ATRESEARCH DISCOVERYResearchers in this area conduct experimentsand direct research activities to discover newmedications. Researchers work to design andperform research experiments at the molecularlevel through detailed manipulation, observation,data analysis, and interpretation. Afterperforming experiments, these professionalsanalyze the data and interpret the results.BIOINFORMATICSBioinformatics professionals build thetechnological tools that are needed to improvethe data analysis process for large data sets. Inshort, workers in the bioinformatics job groupuse advanced mathematical algorithms andcomputer science to organize, analyze, andinterpret biological data.SCIENTIST/PHARMACOLOGISTQualifications:M.S. or Ph.D. in BiologySalary Range:$60,000 – $120,000BIOINFORMATICS SCIENTISTQualifications:M.S. or Ph.D. in Statistics/BiostatisticsSalary Range:$85,000 – $110,000LABORATORY ASSISTANTQualifications:High School DiplomaSalary Range:$25,000 – $45,000ANALYSTQualifications:B.S. in Computer Science, Mathematics,Bioinformatics, or Molecular BiologySalary Range:$25,000 – $35,000JOB GROUPSEXAMPLE OCCUPATIONSMEDICAL EXPERTMedical experts providesupport services throughoutpharmaceutical companies.They provide training forclinical staff and use theirmedical expertise to consultmarketing, sales, andregulatory affairs teams.CLINICAL RESEARCHWorkers in the clinicalresearch group carry outclinical trials, analyzedata, and interpret resultsto make recommendationsabout whether newproducts should go tomarket.BIOSTATISTICSScientists who engage inclinical trials are oftensupported by specialists whoare skilled in applyingadvanced statistics in theanalysis of diverse data sets.Scientists in this area use theirexpertise to guide the experimentaldesign, data collectioneffort, and analysis.MEDICAL WRITERClinical trial procedures andoutcomes must be well documentedto protect the company, trialparticipants, and consumers.Medical writers work with researchersand administrators to developwritten documents for regulatoryapproval, scientific journals,conferences, and marketinginitiatives.CLINICAL TRIAL RECRUITMENTBefore a drug can go to market, thedeveloping organization mustdemonstrate that it is effective andsafe for human consumption.Managing the clinical trial processrequires workers who will be able todevelop and carry out a participantrecruitment plan and work directlywith participants.MEDICAL EXPERTQualifications:M.S. or Ph.D. in Science(e.g., Biology)Salary Range:$120,000 – $200,000DIRECTOR OF CLINICALRESEARCH DEVELOPMENTQualifications:M.S. or Ph.D. in Science(e.g., Biology)Salary Range:$150,000 – $200,000DIRECTOR OF CLINICALBIOSTATISTICSQualifications:M.S. or Ph.D. inBiological/BiomedicalSciencesSalary Range:$120,000 – $200,000PROTOCOL DEVELOPMENTSCIENTISTQualifications:B.S. or M.S. inBiological/BiomedicalSciences or R.N.Salary Range:$80,000 – $200,000DIRECTOR OF CLINICALPROJECTS MANAGEMENTQualifications:B.S. or M.S. in ScienceSalary Range:$80,000 – $200,000CLINICAL RESEARCHASSOCIATEQualifications:B.S. in Biological/BiomedicalSciences or R.N.Salary Range:$40,000 – $80,000BIOSTATISTICSASSOCIATEQualifications:B.S. in Biological/BiomedicalSciencesSalary Range:$80,000 – $110,000MEDICAL WRITERQualifications:M.S. in Science(e.g., Biology) or R.N.Salary Range:$80,000 – $110,000CLINICAL TRIAL ASSOCIATEQualifications:B.S. in Science or R.N.Salary Range:$40,000 – $80,000JOB GROUPSEXAMPLE OCCUPATIONSINFORMATIONSYSTEMSWorkers in this areaprovide technical support,computer software andhardware installation,system management, andmaintenance of computersystems.BUSINESSDEVELOPMENTWorkers in this job groupengage in the preparation,negotiation, and managementof contracts that have beensecured. In addition, workers inthis area identify strategicalliances for future contractsand licensure.FINANCE/ACCOUNTINGWorkers in this job groupkeep track of the financialoperations of the organization.They track financialsystems such as externalcontracts, employeecompensation, and stocks.LEGALMany of the functional areas inbioscience companies benefit fromlegal advice when entering intocontracts and agreements witheveryone from clinical trialparticipants to material suppliers.In addition, these professionalsmay also help to prepare patentfilings for the company.HUMAN RESOURCESHuman resources professionals supportorganizational goals through themanagement of personnel. Employeesin this group usually work in aspecialized area. Key areas in mostlarge firms include employee relations,compensation, benefits, training, andequal employment opportunity.CHIEF INFORMATIONOFFICERQualifications:B.S./M.S. in ComputerScience, InformationTechnology, BusinessAdministration, or a RelatedFieldSalary Range:$150,000 – $250,000COMMUNICATIONSCommunicationsspecialists supportorganizational relationswith the public andinvestors. These individualswork to increasepublic awareness ofcompany activities andscientific contributions.CORPORATECOMMUNICATIONSMANAGERQualifications:B.A. in Communications,English, or Business RelatedFieldSalary Range:$100,000 – $150,000INFORMATION SERVICETECHNICIANQualifications:High School DiplomaSalary Range:$40,000 – $80,000COMMUNICATIONSSPECIALISTQualifications:B.S. or B.A. inCommunications or BusinessSalary Range:$40,000 – $80,000BUSINESS DEVELOPMENTMANAGERQualifications:B.S. in Marketing/BusinessSalary Range:$80,000 – $100,000FINANCE ACCOUNTINGMANAGERQualifications:B.S. in Accounting,FinanceSalary Range:$80,000 – $100,000LEGAL COUNSELQualifications:Law DegreeSalary Range:$150,000 – $250,000HUMAN RESOURCESMANAGERQualifications:B.S. in Human Resources orRelated Business FieldSalary Range:$80,000 – $100,000CONTRACTSADMINISTRATORQualifications:B.S. in BusinessSalary Range:$50,000 – $80,000FINANCIAL ANALYSTQualifications:B.S. in Finance AccountingSalary Range:$50,000 – $80,000PARALEGALQualifications:B.S. DegreeSalary Range:$40,000 – $80,000HUMAN RESOURCESREPRESENTATIVEQualifications:B.S. in Human Resources orRelated Business FieldSalary Range:$40,000 – $80,000JOB GROUPSEXAMPLE OCCUPATIONSQUALITY ASSURANCEWorkers in the qualityassurance job group take thefirst steps to minimize productdefects by establishingspecific guidelines for themanufacturing process.Workers in this area manageand participate in the reviewof the manufacturingprocedures.QUALITY CONTROLOnce the process formanufacturing has beenoutlined and implemented,workers in the area of qualitycontrol work to make surethat the raw materials,equipment, and appliedprocess all meet bothinternal and externalstandards.VALIDATIONValidation specialistsdevelop, implement, andmanage testing plans andmethods to ensure thatthe manufacturingprocedures and resultingproducts meet regulatoryrequirements.DISPENSARY/MEASUREMENTIn order for the products to bemanufactured, the largequantities of materials mustbe scaled down to sizes thatare needed for individualproduction. Workers in thisarea need a solid understandingof measurement.QUALITY ASSURANCEMANAGERQualifications:B.S. in Biological/BiomedicalScienceSalary Range:$80,000 – $120,000QUALITY ASSURANCEDOCUMENTATIONADMINISTRATORQualifications:High School DiplomaSalary Range:$30,000 – $50,000QUALITY CONTROLENGINEER/SUPERVISORQualifications:B.S./M.S. in EngineeringSalary Range:$60,000 – $120,000VALIDATION DIRECTORQualifications:B.S./M.S. in Science (e.g., Biology,Chemistry, Engineering)Salary Range:$120,000 – $200,000SENIOR TECHNICIANQualifications:Experience in MeasurementSalary Range:$40,000 – $80,000QUALITY CONTROLTECHNICIANQualifications:High School DiplomaSalary Range:$35,000 – $60,000VALIDATION SPECIALISTQualifications:B.S./M.S. in Science(e.g., Biology, Chemistry,Engineering)Salary Range:$40,000 – $80,000REGULATORYWorkers in the regulatory affairs job groupensure that the product developmentprocess and the final product meet therequirements of various regulatingagencies. These workers prepare proceduraldocumentation, ensure that the correctpaperwork is submitted to the properagencies, and notify employees within theorganizations of required policies andprocedures.MANAGER REGULATORY AFFAIRSQualifications:(B.S./M.S. in Science(e.g., Biology, Chemistry, Engineering)Salary Range:$80,000 – $120,000REGULATORY AFFAIRS ASSOCIATEQualifications:B.S. in Science(e.g., Biology, Chemistry, Engineering)Salary Range:$30,000 – $50,000DISPENSARY TECHNICIANQualifications:Experience in MeasurementSalary Range:$30,000 – $50,000JOB GROUPSEXAMPLE OCCUPATIONSPLANNING & SUPPLIERMANAGEMENTWorkers involved withplanning and suppliermanagement ensure that theorganization is aware of themarket trends that mayinfluence production. Inaddition, they manage thevendors who supply the rawmaterials used in drugproduction.PRODUCTION &OPERATIONSWorkers involved in production andoperations follow strict processes in theassessment of test samples, purificationprocedures, and maintenance ofadvanced equipment. In addition,organizations must ensure that the rawmaterials needed at various stages ofproduction are available.TRANSPORTATION &DISTRIBUTIONProducts must be made available tocustomers. There are many workers in anorganization that are involved in theprocess of putting shipments together andtransporting them to customers. Forexample, workers must package andmonitor shipments and make sure that thecompany is following all of the state lawsassociated with transporting of goods.FACILITIESWorkers in this area maintainfacility equipment and space toensure that all safety standardsare met. In addition, theyprovide guidance to developstandard operating procedures.DIRECTOR OF PLANNING& FORECASTINGQualifications:Ph.D. in Science(e.g., Biology, Chemistry,Engineering)Salary Range:$150,000 – $200,000PLANNERQualifications:B.S. in Science(e.g., Biology, Chemistry,Engineering)Salary Range:$40,000 – $80,000MANUFACTURING SUPERVISORQualifications:B.S. in Science(e.g., Biology, Chemistry,Engineering)Salary Range:$80,000 – $120,000TRANSPORTATION ANALYSTQualifications:High School Diploma/B.S. in BusinessSalary Range:$40,000 – $80,000SENIOR ENGINEERQualifications:B.S. in EngineeringSalary Range:$80,000 – $120,000MANUFACTURING TECHNICIANQualifications:High School DiplomaSalary Range:$40,000 – $80,000WAREHOUSE TECHNICIANQualifications:High School DiplomaSalary Range:$30,000 – $40,000FACILITIES TECHNICIANQualifications:A.A./A.S. in Mechanical/Electrical FieldSalary Range:$30,000 – $40,000JOB GROUPSEXAMPLE OCCUPATIONSMARKETINGMarketing specialists use their expertiseto provide recommendations for activitiessuch as product packaging, marketingbudgets, product launches, and productexpansion.SALESThose working in the sales job groupprovide technical assistance andinformation to customers, the medicaland scientific community, andpharmaceutical employees.MARKETING RESEARCH MANAGERQualifications:B.S. in Marketing or Business,MBA preferredSalary Range:$80,000 – $120,000MEDICAL/CLINICAL SCIENCE LIAISONQualifications:B.S. in Science (e.g., Biology, Chemistry,Engineering), MBA preferredSalary Range:$80,000 – $120,000MEDICAL INFORMATION SPECIALISTQualifications:B.S. in Pharmacy or Nursing or M.S./Ph.D.Salary Range:$30,000 – $70,000SALES REPRESENTATIVEQualifications:B.S./M.S. in related Scientific Discipline(e.g., Biology), Marketing, or CommunicationsSalary Range:$30,000 – $120,000Visit www.bio-one.org for job information, career videos, and links to the universities and colleges that can prepare you for work in the biosciences.DRCD QRBSMMSclinicalDEVELOPMENTmanufacturing supply chainqualityCONTROLregulatoryAFFAIRSsales& MARKETINGdiscoveryRESEARCH & bio-business

Get Growing Brochure – Schools

Monday, April 26th, 2010
schools getgrowing CAREER PATHS
INSTITUTIONS
ASSOCIATE DEGREES BACHELOR’S DEGREES MASTER’S DEGREES DOCTORAL DEGREES
Atlantic Cape Community College
Bergen Community College
Brookdale Community College
Burlington County College
Camden County College
County College of Morris
Cumberland County College
Essex County College
Gloucester County College
Hudson County Community College
Mercer County Community College
Middlesex County College
Ocean County College
Passaic County Community College
Raritan Valley Community College
Salem Community College
Sussex County Community College
Union County College
Warren County Community College
Bloomfield College
Caldwell College
Centenary College
College of Saint Elizabeth
DeVry University
Drew University
Fairleigh Dickinson University
Felician College
Georgian Court University
Kean University
Monmouth University
Montclair State University
New Jersey City University
New Jersey Institute of Technology
Princeton University
Ramapo College of New Jersey
The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Rider University
Rowan University
Rutgers University
Saint Peter’s College
Seton Hall University
Stevens Institute of Technology
The College of New Jersey
Thomas Edison State College
University of Medicine & Dentistry of NJ
William Paterson University
FOUR YEAR SCHOOLS TWO YEAR SCHOOLS
A Certificate in Bioscience Related Major
B Associates Degree in Biology/Biochemistry/Bioinformatics/Biotechnology
C Associates Degree in Chemistry/Chemical Technology
D Associates Degree in Laboratory Science -
Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Technology/Biomedical Technology
E Associates Degree in Bioscience Related Engineering
- Biomedical, Chemical, or Manufacturing Engineering/Engineering Science
F Bachelor Degree in Biology/Biochemistry/Bioinformatics/Biotechnology
G Bachelor Degree in Chemistry
H Bachelor Degree in Laboratory Science
- Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Technology/Biomedical Technology
I Bachelor Degree in Bioscience Related Engineering
- Biomedical, Chemical, or Manufacturing Engineering/Engineering Science
J Graduate Certificate in Bioscience Related Major
K Master’s Degrees in Biology/Biochemistry/Bioinformatics/Biotechnology
L Master’s Degree in Chemistry
M Master’s Degree in Laboratory Science
- Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Technology/Biomedical Technology
N Master’s Degree in Bioscience Related Engineering
- Biomedical, Chemical, or Manufacturing Engineering/Engineering Science
O Master’s Pharmacy Related Degree
P Doctoral Degrees in Biology/Biochemistry/Bioinformatics/Biotechnology
Q Doctoral Degrees in Chemistry
R Doctoral Degrees in Laboratory Science
- Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Technology/Biomedical Technology
S Doctoral Degrees in Bioscience Related Engineering
- Biomedical, Chemical, or Manufacturing Engineering/Engineering Science
T Doctoral Degrees Pharmacy Related Degree DEGREE LEGEND
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schools getgrowing CAREER PATHSA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S TINSTITUTIONSASSOCIATE DEGREES BACHELOR’S DEGREES MASTER’S DEGREES DOCTORAL DEGREESAtlantic Cape Community CollegeBergen Community CollegeBrookdale Community CollegeBurlington County CollegeCamden County CollegeCounty College of MorrisCumberland County CollegeEssex County CollegeGloucester County CollegeHudson County Community CollegeMercer County Community CollegeMiddlesex County CollegeOcean County CollegePassaic County Community CollegeRaritan Valley Community CollegeSalem Community CollegeSussex County Community CollegeUnion County CollegeWarren County Community CollegeBloomfield CollegeCaldwell CollegeCentenary CollegeCollege of Saint ElizabethDeVry UniversityDrew UniversityFairleigh Dickinson UniversityFelician CollegeGeorgian Court UniversityKean UniversityMonmouth UniversityMontclair State UniversityNew Jersey City UniversityNew Jersey Institute of TechnologyPrinceton UniversityRamapo College of New JerseyThe Richard Stockton College of New JerseyRider UniversityRowan UniversityRutgers UniversitySaint Peter’s CollegeSeton Hall UniversityStevens Institute of TechnologyThe College of New JerseyThomas Edison State CollegeUniversity of Medicine & Dentistry of NJWilliam Paterson UniversityFOUR YEAR SCHOOLS TWO YEAR SCHOOLSA Certificate in Bioscience Related MajorB Associates Degree in Biology/Biochemistry/Bioinformatics/BiotechnologyC Associates Degree in Chemistry/Chemical TechnologyD Associates Degree in Laboratory Science -Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Technology/Biomedical TechnologyE Associates Degree in Bioscience Related Engineering- Biomedical, Chemical, or Manufacturing Engineering/Engineering ScienceF Bachelor Degree in Biology/Biochemistry/Bioinformatics/BiotechnologyG Bachelor Degree in ChemistryH Bachelor Degree in Laboratory Science- Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Technology/Biomedical TechnologyI Bachelor Degree in Bioscience Related Engineering- Biomedical, Chemical, or Manufacturing Engineering/Engineering ScienceJ Graduate Certificate in Bioscience Related MajorK Master’s Degrees in Biology/Biochemistry/Bioinformatics/BiotechnologyL Master’s Degree in ChemistryM Master’s Degree in Laboratory Science- Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Technology/Biomedical TechnologyN Master’s Degree in Bioscience Related Engineering- Biomedical, Chemical, or Manufacturing Engineering/Engineering ScienceO Master’s Pharmacy Related DegreeP Doctoral Degrees in Biology/Biochemistry/Bioinformatics/BiotechnologyQ Doctoral Degrees in ChemistryR Doctoral Degrees in Laboratory Science- Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Technology/Biomedical TechnologyS Doctoral Degrees in Bioscience Related Engineering- Biomedical, Chemical, or Manufacturing Engineering/Engineering ScienceT Doctoral Degrees Pharmacy Related Degree DEGREE LEGENDWWW.BIO-ONE.ORGLEARN MORE AT

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